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Collections uncovered 15

Wed, 27 Mar 2019
Overview
Enigmas of Bletchley Park

In January 1940, Bletchley Park made the first British wartime break into the German Enigma cipher – greatly helped by information passed on by Polish cryptographers. However, that first break was only the beginning. Enigma was not a single machine, but a family of machines. Developed for commercial use in 1924, Enigma was adopted by German armed forces from 1926. Its original design was adapted for the German military, secret service and state, and use by Germany’s allies. Each change posed a fresh challenge to the Codebreakers. These Enigma machines, held at Bletchley Park, represent some of the many types in use before and during WW2.

Enigmas of Bletchley Park
1 / 10Enigma D, A1214. The Enigma D was developed in 1926. It is the earliest model on display at Bletchley Park, but already more sophisticated than the original design. Its three rotors, which scrambled letters to create the encryption, could be removed and placed into the machine in any order. Its reflector, which directed the electrical signal in the machine back through the rotors, was also settable. This machine was delivered to the Italian Navy in 1932 and used by Benito Mussolini. It was captured in Northern Italy by US Naval Officers on 29th April 1945.
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14 Mar 2019 — 14 Mar 2020
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24 Mar 2018 — 1 Mar 2028
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