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Preserving Bletchley Park

Codebreaking operations at Bletchley Park came to an end in 1946

After the war Bletchley Park became home to a variety of training schools: for teachers, Post Office workers, air traffic control system engineers, and members of GCHQ. In 1987, after a fifty-year association with British Intelligence, Bletchley Park was finally closed.

There were moves to demolish the whole site in favour of housing development and a supermarket. In 1991 the Bletchley Archaeological and Historical Society formed a small committee with the aim of saving Bletchley Park in tribute to the remarkable people whose collective intellects changed the course of WW2, and so that the story could be kept alive for the education and enjoyment of future generations.

On 10 February 1992, the committee persuaded Milton Keynes Council to declare most of Bletchley Park a conservation area. Three days later the Bletchley Park Trust was formed and in 1994 its Chief Patron, HRH The Duke of Kent, opened the site to the public, as a museum. In June 1999 Trust was awarded a 250 year leasehold of the core historic areas of the Park, and this was followed in 2009 by a successful bid for support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Bletchley Park is now a self funding historic visitor attraction with over 250,000 visitors per year, and additional buildings continue to be restored and opened to the public.

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The Challenge

Explore the different types of machines and codes that were using during World War Two

The Challenge

Explore the different types of machines and codes that were using during World War Two